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Boxer

Strong, handsome and jowly. That’s a boxer. While this breed can look quite intimidating at first, once you get to know them, their playful and enthusiastic personality shines through.

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Animalia Team
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    Country of Origin

    Germany

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    Breed Group

    Working Group

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    Height

    Male 23-25 In

    Female 21.5-23.5 In

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    Weight

    Male 60-70 Ib

    Female 50-65 Ib

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    Life Span

    10-12 years

In a Nutshell

Boxers are affectionate, playful dogs who make great companions for families with children. Bright, alert and sometimes silly, the Boxer is one of America’s most popular dogs and has been for quite some time. Boxers are versatile dogs who are happy wherever you are (wherever they’ll get plenty of love) and don’t mind spending time indoors. Oh, and they also love to snuggle.

Life With a Boxer

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Energy level

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Trainability Level

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Amount of Shedding

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Tendency of Barking

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Exercise Needs

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    Home Alone

    Consider working from home

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    Living Arrangements

    Apartment will do

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    Kid Friendly

    Yes

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    Pet Friendly

    Yes

Looks & Personality

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Boxers are medium-sized, athletic dogs with muscles that ripple beneath a short coat that comes in brindle, black, or white. There are no miniature or giant varieties of the Boxer. They’re brachycephalic animals, meaning they have broad, short skulls and an underbite.In some cases, this can lead to difficulty breathing. One of the delightful qualities that set the Boxer apart from other breeds is the unique, almost-pleading expressiveness of their dark-brown eyes.

 

Enough about the Boxer’s good looks. What about their temperament? Although Boxers were historically used as fighting dogs, today they’re everything you’d expect from a family pet: loyal, affectionate, playful, courageous, and intelligent. Because they’re so patient, lively, and affectionate, they make especially great dogs for households with children. What’s more, they take their job of watching over their families quite seriously.

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A tip from a vet

As Boxers are especially prone to developing mast cell tumors, and brain tumors, it is extremely important to pay attention to the condition of your dog’s skin during the regular grooming session. Take the time and look for any suspicious lumps, bumps and rashes. Consult your vet with any unusual findings.
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A tip from a trainer

Boxers are intelligent, so they can be stubborn. But with the right training, they can be very well-behaved. They are also fiercely protective of their owners, so proper socialization the moment the puppy enters their new home, is a necessity.
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Did You Know

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    The term “Boxer” started as an affectionate nickname, derived from the breed’s tendency to use its front legs in a manner similar to boxing athletes in the ring.

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    Boxers have the longest tongues of all dog breeds, so it’s not surprising that they were a popular performing breed.

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    White boxers are not really considered to be true boxers as they do not meet the breed standard. They’re also more likely to be deaf than Boxers of other colors.

In The News

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In 2002, the Guinness Book of World Records awarded a Boxer pooch named Brandy the owner of the "Longest tongue on a dog ever." Her tongue measured in at an incredible 17 inches (1 foot, 4 inches) and she still holds the title posthumously.

Famous Boxer Owners

Hugh Jackman, Ryan Reynolds, Justin Timberlake, Kim Kardashian, Lauren Bacall, Humphrey Bogart, Cameron Diaz

The History Behind the Breed

Bred for hunting and working, the Boxer is a Mastiff-type breed that was developed in Germany in the late 19th century. The Boxer is an ancestor of the Bullenbeisser (meaning bull biter), a now extinct breed of dog. Descended from the war dogs of the Assyrian empire, the Bullenbeisser was valued for its strength, agility, and tenacious hold on boars, bulls, and bears. It’s thought that this breed was crossed with the Old English Bulldog, providing the basis for the modern-day Boxer. The Boxer was officially recognized as a breed by the American Kennel Club in 1904. According to the breed standard, there’s only one type of Boxer breed, but they come from different bloodlines. The American Boxer was the last variant to be developed from the Boxer line and is the easiest variant to recognize, thanks to the lack of wrinkles in adult dogs. That said, your Boxer may also be an example of the German or UK variant. As working dogs, Boxers were used for bull baiting, livestock herding, and hunting large animals like boars and bison. They were also one of the first breeds used for military and police service. Unfortunately, Boxers were also used as fighting dogs. Today, Boxers are now valued for their gentler side and are unlikely to act out when they’ve been properly bred, trained, and nurtured.

If a Boxer Could Talk…

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“It doesn’t matter how big I get, I will always sit on your lap and beg for cuddles.”

A Quick Anatomy Lesson

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Brachycephalic dogs, such as the Boxer, were bred to have a characteristic flattened face and short muzzle. It’s cute, but it may put them at a higher risk of developing certain health issues. Responsible breeders will use DNA tests and screening schemes to test Boxers for several health conditions, including hip dysplasia, heart conditions, thyroid deficiency, and certain cancers. Your veterinarian can also help you spot signs of trouble early and develop a proactive, effective healthcare regimen.

Common Health Problems

What about your Boxer?