hero

Pomeranian

Want proof that good things come in small packages? Look no further than the Pomeranian. Pomeranians are among the most popular Toy Group dog breeds, thanks in no small part to their tendency to show loads of affection. Despite their compact size, this breed displays high degrees of loyalty and even some guard-dog qualities.

icon
Animalia Team
  • basic-info

    Country of Origin

    Poland

  • basic-info

    Breed Group

    Spitz family, Toy Group

  • basic-info

    Height

    Male 6-7 In

    Female 3-7 In

  • basic-info

    Weight

    Male 3-7 Ib

    Female 12-16 Ib

  • basic-info

    Life Span

    12-16 years

In a Nutshell

Any Pom owner will tell you that their dog doesn’t act small. Nicknamed “the little dog who thinks he/she can,” it’s no surprise that these little pooches are regarded as big dogs in small bodies. Plan on plenty of walks and lots of noisy play.

Even though Poms may be great apartment pets, they can be quite vocal. Your neighbors may not be thrilled about the noise, but they’ll love your Pomeranian as soon as they’ve been properly introduced.

Life With a Pomeranian

Low (1) High (5)
icon

Energy level

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
icon

Trainability Level

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
icon

Amount of Shedding

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
icon

Tendency of Barking

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
icon

Exercise Needs

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • icon

    Home Alone

    Couldn’t care less

  • icon

    Living Arrangements

    Apartment will do

  • icon

    Kid Friendly

    Yes

  • icon

    Pet Friendly

    Yes

Looks & Personality

image

Poms have a luxuriant, fluffy double coat that comes in a beautiful array of colors, from rich red to black and white. You might come across a white Pom with colored markings or a black Pom with tan markings, but part-colored Pomeranians tend to be rare. Don’t let the beautiful coat scare you away.

 

Pomeranians are not difficult to groom, requiring only one or two brushing sessions a week. Additionally, Pomeranians have fluffy tails that curl up and over the back, a foxy face with alert, wedge-shaped ears, and a thick mane around their neck that can handle the snowy plains of the breed’s native Northern Germany. And you’ll be hard-pressed to find a Pomeranian whose almond-shaped eyes don’t sparkle with intelligence and curiosity.

 

Of course, all dogs are unique in personality and temperament, but you’ll find most Poms to be quite bossy. They’re perky, friendly little dogs that aren’t afraid to verbally intimidate much bigger breeds. Luckily, they get along quite well with other dog breeds when they’re adequately socialized at a young age.
Cute, feisty, and furry, Pomeranians typically make great family dogs as they’re intelligent, loyal, and tend to get along with children. Make sure to show children the appropriate way to play with a smaller dog with a Pomeranian to avoid any mishaps or injuries.

 

Poms make great alert and alarm dogs, though they may be prone to excessive barking. In fact, they sometimes don’t know when to stop barking, so you may want to invest in behavioral training. On that note, Poms make great companions for the elderly because of their alertness as well as their delightful personalities.

icon

A tip from a vet

Pomeranians are more likely than other dogs to have problems with their teeth. They have a small mouth in relation to their teeth, which can lead to overcrowding and eventually problems such as gum disease and gingivitis. It's important to bring your Pom over for periodic dental cleanings. Otherwise, your buddy may suffer daily tooth and gum pain or even lose their teeth.
icon

A tip from a trainer

Pomeranians are highly intelligent, which means they’re easy to train. This explains why there are so many Poms at dog shows. They’re eager to learn new tricks and can be extremely well-behaved. Because of their vocality, Poms sometimes get a bad rap. Proper training early in life can help eliminate such unwanted behaviors as excessive barking.
bg
icon icon

Did You Know

    did-you-know-12

    Blue Pomeranians are not actually blue. They have dull black fur with a bit of blue coloring. Some blue Poms also have blue eyes.

    did-you-know-10

    Two Pomeranians survived the sinking of the Titanic.

    did-you-know-16

    Michelangelo’s Pom famously lounged on a satin pillow and watched on as he painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

In The News

banner
At one time, Queen Victoria had 35 Pomeranians in her royal kennels. Among those she liked best was a Pom named Marco, said to be the finest Spitz in all of England. The Queen became quite infatuated with Pomeranians when she stumbled on Marco during a trip to Florence, Italy. It's important to note that Poms were much larger at the time, weighing in at an average of 20 pounds. Marco, however, was especially small, weighing about 12 pounds. He was renowned for his strong character, gracious beauty, and a royal disposition. Marco even won a number of prizes in Britain's national dog show championship.

Famous Pomeranian Owners

Michelangelo, Mozart, Paris Hilton, Teddy Roosevelt, Sylvester Stallone, Fran Drescher, Nicole Richie, Keanu Reeves, Gwen Stefani

The History Behind the Breed

Take one look at the Pomeranian’s thick fur, and you can discern that their forefathers came from the Arctic. Poms descend from larger Spitz breeds and are related to the Norwegian Elkhound, the Schipperke, and German Spitz. Long ago, Pomeranians were working arctic dogs in Pomerania, a historical region that bordered Poland, Germany, and the Baltic Sea. They were relied upon to guard homes, protect livestock, and pull sleds. Hence, their feisty, energetic nature. We have Queen Victoria to thank today’s smaller Pomeranians. The Pomeranian breed as we know it today was developed by English fanciers who imported them from Germany and bred them down to a smaller size. The size of the breed decreased by half during Queen Victoria's lifetime alone.

If a Pomeranian Could Talk…

banner
bg
“Don’t let my cute face and tiny stature fool you. I’m not to be messed with.”

A Quick Anatomy Lesson

anatomy-lesson-class-img
anatomy-lesson-img

Overall the Pomeranian is a sturdy, healthy dog despite its miniature size. However, they are prone to obesity. Poms generally don’t need much food, which means it’s easy to overfeed them. Therefore, it’s important to watch their portion sizes and give them as much exercise as possible.

Common Health Problems

What about your Pomeranian?