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Toy Poodle

What makes Toy Poodles so popular is their incredible intelligence. Generally regarded as one of the smartest dog breeds, poodles are highly trainable, extremely eager to please people, and love being the center of attention.

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Animalia Team
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    Country of Origin

    Germany

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    Breed Group

    Non-Sporting Group

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    Height

    Male 9-10 In

    Female 8-9 In

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    Weight

    Male 5-7 Ib

    Female 4-6 Ib

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    Life Span

    10-18 years

In a Nutshell

Toy Poodles have an aristocratic reputation, but they bring intelligence and affection to even a humble home. They are famously known for their proven excellence in shows. Their curly and voluminous coat in combination with a confident strut always seems to steal the show. To boot, the breed is intelligent, athletic, and loyal, making it a great choice for single owners and families alike.

Life With a Toy Poodle

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Energy level

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Trainability Level

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Amount of Shedding

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Tendency of Barking

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Exercise Needs

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    Home Alone

    Couldn’t care less

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    Living Arrangements

    Apartment will do

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    Kid Friendly

    Yes

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    Pet Friendly

    Yes

Looks & Personality

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Standing at 10 inches tall and weighing just around 5 pounds, tiny Toy Poodles still carry themselves proudly and elegantly. These friendly, fun-loving, and outgoing dogs consider themselves an essential and loyal part of the family. However, they don’t want to be the baby. They are very devoted and eager to please. They’ll get disgruntled if they feel left out of activities or are left alone for too long. They may punish you for leaving them alone by acting out with destructive behaviors. 

 

Toy Poodles are brainy dogs and early training is recommended for mental stimulation. It’s a great way to show off their talents at hide-and-seek and more complex games. Your pooch will hate boredom and get vocal to let you know. Remember, however, that their bark is much worse than their bite. 

 

The Toy Poodle’s small size means they can be happy in small spaces without overwhelming amounts of strenuous activity. Because of that, Toy Poodles make great pets for apartment dwellers and dog lovers without the ability to commit to an exceedingly high-energy breed. In short, a Toy Poodle is not a toy. Far from just an ornamental pet, they’re energetic playmates and affectionate members of the family.

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A tip from a vet

Due to the nature of their curly, shed-free coat, Toy Poodles need a lot of brushing – preferably daily. Their other grooming needs include bathing, regular nail trimming, ear cleaning and teeth brushing. While show dogs have several complex haircuts, non-show owners can choose the more standard sporting cut as it’s easier to maintain. Poodles tend to have bags of energy, so they’ll need 2 decent walks every day – ideally adding up to a total of at least one hour’s worth of exercise.
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A tip from a trainer

Despite appearing proud and level-headed, Poodles are real people-pleasers. They love spending time with humans, especially their owners. They’re also very intelligent, which makes them a delight to train. Poodles are always learning, even when you don’t want them to, so it’s important to teach them good habits from an early age.
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Did You Know

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    The reason behind their flamboyant-looking hairdos? Poodles are great swimmers and were initially bred as water-retrieving dogs. Their coats quickly got water-logged, however, and pulled them down. The solution was to cut off most of their hair while leaving some around their vital organs to keep them warm and around vulnerable joints to protect them from injury.

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    Due to their intelligence, biddable natures, athleticism and looks the Poodle was frequently employed in circuses, particularly in France.

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    Toy Poodles don’t shed, making them a great pet for people with allergies.

In The News

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Elvis Presley owned more than one Poodle throughout the years. Whilst stationed in Germany as an American GI he had a Poodle companion who went by the name of Champagne. He was also known to gift the breed to those he loved. Priscilla received a Toy called Honey and he gifted his beloved mum Gladys Duke, another Toy who was named in honor of John Wayne.

Famous Toy Poodle Owners

Lucille Ball, Eartha Kitt, Elizabeth Taylor, King Louis XVI of France, James Brown

The History Behind the Breed

The standard Poodle is the national dog of France, which is why many call them a “French poodle.” Poodles were, however, first developed and bred in Germany as duck hunters. Today in France, the Poodle is known as the caniche, “duck dog.” The word “poodle” derives from the German pudelin, which refers to splashing in water. The Toy Poodle was created for those captivated by the original Poodle's personality but looking for a smaller dog. Furthermore, because they are highly intelligent, easy-to-train, and even comical, Poodles were popular performing dogs. Throughout the 15th and 16th centuries, Poodles were solely owned by the rich and famous and featured in paintings by artists Rembrandt and Albrecht Dürer. Toy Poodles rose to greater fame by the late 18th century, appearing in artwork and in the courts of French nobility.

If a Toy Poodle Could Talk…

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“I may be small, but don’t underestimate me – I’m the smartest kid in this household”

A Quick Anatomy Lesson

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Like many small dog breeds, the Toy Poodle is prone to conditions like an inherited eye disorder and slipped knee caps that require testing to spot proactively. They don't shed and are considered allergy-friendly. Because their coat is so light on shedding, their hair curls in on itself and mats, which can lead to skin infections.

Common Health Problems

What about your Toy Poodle?